Top Three Social Media No-Nos for Dermatologists
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
Next Steps in Derm, in partnership with ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference, interviewed Dr. DiAnne Davis (a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist specializing in noninvasive facial rejuvenation, skin of color, hair loss, and cosmetic dermatologic surgery) about social media dos and don'ts. Watch as she offers her three best tips on how dermatologists should protect themselves bef …
Patient Buzz Series: BeautyTok’s “Skin Cycling”
skin cycling
by Allison Sit on
“Skin Cycling” is the latest BeautyTok trend and it has a dermatologist to thank. Dr. Whitney Bowe created the four-night skincare regimen, which she popularized on social media. The routine includes chemical exfoliation, retinol and recovery to reset the skin and strengthen the skin barrier. Are you ready for questions about the latest beauty trends? Review this list of articles in the con …
It’s Mnemonic Monday! | Side Effects of Hedgehog Inhibitors Vismodegib and Sonidegib
hedgehog inhibitors
by Jacqueline McKesey, MD, MS on
On this Mnemonic Monday, we challenge you to remember the side effects of hedgehog inhibitors, vismodegib and sonidegib, with the following mnemonic: MAD Weight loss M=muscle spasm (72% of cases) A=alopecia (64% of cases) D= dysgeusia (55% of cases) Weight loss= weight loss (45% of cases) Click HERE to download or print your mnemonic card. Study More! Need a refresher on he …
Tinea versicolor – Friday Pop Quiz 9/2/2022
by Andrea Waldman, MD on
A 42-year-old male presents with multiple round to oval hypomelanotic patches measuring several centimeters in size. The lesions coalesce centrally and are more prominent on the trunk. Associated fine scale is apparent upon scratching the skin. The distribution is symmetric and favors the chest, abdomen, and back. Which of the following is not a proposed mechanism of the hypopigmented skin in …
The Many Faces of Psoriasis | Part 2
psoriasis
by Lauren C. Payne, MD, MS, FAAD on
Did you know that psoriasis doesn’t just present on the arms, legs, and trunk? It can also appear in non-conventional locations (aka “special site” psoriasis) including the scalp, face, and body folds (such as the axillary, inframammary, and inguinal fields, and intergluteal clefts). In the skin folds, psoriasis is also referred to as “inverse psoriasis.” In darker skin types, the areas …