Suncare Sundays: Suncare is Important for Every Skin Tone
Suncare for every skin tone
by NeutrogenaMD on
Suncare is important for every skin tone. The risk of sunburn and skin cancer correlate with skin type – not ethnicity.1 Ethnicity does not confer skin type. Our population is changing rapidly, and within the next few decades minority populations will become the majority.1,2 African Americans, Asians, Hispanics, Middle Easterners, Asian Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, or individuals …
Suncare Sundays: Tanning Beds are Not Safer Than the Sun
Tanning Beds
by NeutrogenaMD on
Tanning beds are NOT safer than the sun.1 More than 419,000 cases of skin cancer in the U.S. each year are linked to indoor tanning.2 Melanoma is the second most common cancer in females age 15-29.3 Tanning = DNA injury to your skin4 Skin exposed to UV radiation increases production of melanin to protect the skin from further damage. The increased melanin causing the tan color change is a si …
Suncare Sundays: UV Index Explained
by NeutrogenaMD on
Do you know what your Ultraviolet Index is today? Ultraviolet index (UV index) is a measure of the strength of the sun’s harmful rays at a particular place and time.  The higher the number, the greater the chance of sun damage.1  UV Index was developed by Canadian scientists in 1992 and standardized by the UN’s World Health Organization and World Meteorological Organization in 1994.  U …
Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage – A JDD Dermatology Podcast Recap
UV damage
by James J. Contestable, MD on
We all discuss sun protection with our patients.  At this point, our recommendations are predictable – “avoidance, protective clothing, SPF 30+, broad-spectrum, water-resistant, and reapplication.” But how can we effectively change patient behavior? Important note – this discussion has wide arching correlations to all areas of human behavior, medicine, and dermatology that spans more th …
The Science of Sun Protection: A JDD Dermatology Podcast Recap
sun protection
by James J. Contestable, MD on
A patient in my clinic was recently prescribed 5-fluorouracil for severe photodamage, diffuse actinic keratoses. He is 24 years old and, unfortunately, lacked knowledge about photoprotection.  It was sobering to think about how much longer he has to live and the damage already done. Strides have been made over the years in educating our patients about photoprotection, but recently, patients have …