JDD Corner

Intralesional Triamcinolone Acetonide in the Treatment of Traction Alopecia
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
In this case series, JDD authors evaluate the efficacy and safety of intralesional triamcinolone acetonide injections (ILK) when used with topical minoxidil in the management of traction alopecia in 6 African American women. Background Traction alopecia (TA) is a form of hair loss secondary to repetitive and/or prolonged tension to a hair follicle over an extended period of time. This typically …
Compounding in Dermatology Update – Part 2
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In part 1 of this 2-part series, Dr. Kircik along with JDD authors Vlatka Agnetta MD, Abel Torres MD JD MBA, Seemal R. Desai MD, and Adelaide A. Hebert MD, reviewed the regulatory landscape of compounding in dermatology, including federal and state regulations. In part 2, they discuss FDA and USP Compounding Lists/ Categories and provide their final thoughts on in-office compounding. FDA Compound …
Compounding in Dermatology Update – Part 1
Compounding in Dermatology Update
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
Medication compounding is defined as any alteration, mixing, or combining of two or more ingredients that make the drug more specific to the needs of the patient.1 Compounded medications are used widely in patient care to meet their individual medical needs and maximize treatment outcomes. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) have been the leading organiz …
JDD March Issue Highlights
March JDD
by Next Steps In Derm Team on
These are the issue highlights from the March issue of the JDD!   Azelaic acid 15% foam may be an efficacious therapy for rosacea while also offering a better side effect profile in Rosacea Treatment Satisfaction: Matching Adjusted Indirect Treatment Comparison Analysis of Metronidazole Gel or Cream vs Azelaic Acid Foam.   Nail Surgery Myths and Truths dispels common myths encount …
Lichen Myxedematosus
Lichen Myxedematosus
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Lichen myxedematosus (LM) is an idiopathic cutaneous mucinosis, commonly described as localized scleromyxedema. In contrast to scleromyxedema, there is typically no systemic involvement. Treatment options are limited and spontaneous resolution has been reported. JDD authors Amaris Geisler BS, Mojgan Hosseinipour DO, Nikki S. Vyas MD, Robert Phelps MD, Charles Gropper MD, and Cindy Hoffman DO p …