Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Dutasteride Therapeutic Cheat Sheet
by Azam Qureshi, MD on
Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is one of the most common forms of hair loss and represents a frequently faced disabling concern in dermatology visits. Targeting the 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) pathway has been shown to be an efficacious mechanism of action, with finasteride being the only systemic FDA-approved drug to treat male AGA. Recently, its sister drug, dutasteride, has been increasingly utili …
JDD August Issue Highlights | Special Focus: Psoriasis
psoriasis
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) focuses on Psoriasis and features mix of original articles, editorials, and case reports. Among many of the topics explored in this issue are treatment of scalp psoriasis, nail psoriasis, respiratory tract infections in patients using biologics for hidradenitis suppurativa, classification of actinic keratosis, lichen planus pigmentosus …
Journal Buzz: Botulinum Toxin for Hidradenitis Suppurativa | The Expert Weighs In
botulinum toxin
by Allison Sit on
Botulinum toxin is a safe and potentially effective treatment alternative in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) patients who are resistant to standard therapies, according to the authors of a systematic review published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology. How does this review add to the conversation about new treatments for HS? In which HS patients might dermatologists consider botulinum toxin as …
Chlorhexidine Therapeutic Cheat Sheet
CHLORHEXIDINE
by Azam Qureshi, MD on
Disorders of the hair follicles, including hidradenitis suppurativa and folliculitis, are some of the most common dermatologic conditions affecting a wide variety of patients. Chlorhexidine’s bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal properties enable it to be a potent defender of the pilosebaceous unit. We continue our series, Therapeutic Cheat Sheet, with a closer look at chlorhexidine, which has far r …
Off-Label Use of Oral Metronidazole in Dermatology | Therapeutic Cheat Sheet
by Adrianna Gonzalez Lopez, MD on
While we have an increasing armamentarium of biologic agents and targeted systemic medications for certain dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis, treatment options are still limited for a litany of other inflammatory cutaneous disorders. Additionally, when discussing therapeutic options, patients often opt for medications that are established, safe, well-tolerated and mini …