pruritus

Pregabalin for Chronic Pruritus – Therapeutic Cheat Sheet
by Azam Qureshi, MD on
Chronic pruritus affects 8-16% of the general population and has a profound impact on patient quality of life.1-3Although the symptom of pruritus may originate from a number of underlying etiologies, including metabolic derangements and infectious causes, along with neoplastic, inflammatory, or psychiatric conditions, other cases may be idiopathic in nature.4 Given the diversity of underlying cont …
Rosacea in Skin of Color Patients: Nuances in Diagnosis & Treatment
Rosacea in skin of color
by Freba Farhat, MD on
Wow! Prior to my attendance to the 2020 Skin of Color Virtual Conference, I had not fully realized the deficits in my learning when it came to recognizing common dermatologic conditions in our skin of color (SOC) patient population. Prior to Dr. Ted Rosen’s lecture on rosacea in SOC patients I had figured I knew enough to identify this dermatologic condition in most clinical settings as well as …
Terbinafine Therapeutic Cheat Sheet
terbinafine
by Adrianna Gonzalez Lopez, MD on
Dermatophyte infections are estimated to affect about 25% of the world’s population, representing some of the most common infections in the world. Conditions such as onychomycosis and tinea capitis may significantly impact quality of life by way of their symptoms or appearance, making adequate treatment important. Oral and topical formulations of terbinafine are commonly used on- and off-label f …
Dupilumab Therapeutic Cheat Sheet
Dupilumab
by Azam Qureshi, MD on
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin condition characterized by pruritus and occurs as a result of factors related to impaired skin barrier and immune response, as well as environmental and infectious agents. Patients with poor control on topical therapy are looking for safe and effective systemic treatments. We continue our series, Therapeutic Cheat Sheet, with a closer look at dupilumab, whic …
Eruptive Milia Within a Tattoo
Milia within a tattoo
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
Introduction The most frequently reported tattoo-related dermatoses, according to a study of 234 tattooed patients, are allergic,1infectious,2,3 and granulomatous4,5 reactions occurring in 2.1% of this population.6 Less common reactions are lichenoid,7photoallergic,8 pseudolymphomatous,9 discoid lupus erythematosus,10 incidental skin neoplasm,11 and koebnerization of psoriasis.12,13Milia within t …