Atopic Dermatitis

Pediatric Scaling Diseases: An Approach to Pediatric Psoriasis
Pediatric Psoriasis
by Jacqueline McKesey, MD, MS on
Dr. Lawrence F. Eichenfield, meeting co-chair for the 17th Annual Women’s and Pediatric Dermatology Seminar, kicked off session III with a superb talk titled “Scaling the Heights…and Below, Pediatric Scaling Diseases: Psoriasis and Others”,  giving us a bird’s eye view on the old and the new regarding pediatric psoriasis. Dr. Eichenfield is a complete rock star and served as a valued …
Skincare Mondays | Surfactants in Skincare
Surfactants in skincare
by NeutrogenaMD on
For most consumers, a skincare routine is a positive part of their daily routine. Thirty-eight percent (38%) see it as ‘me’ time. Sixty-three percent (63%) wash their face at least two times per day,1 yet roughly half of consumers (men and women) report using bath wash or hand soap to cleanse their face.2 So it's no surprise that over half of consumers surveyed have no idea what ingredients …
JDD Issue Highlights | May 2022
Mohs
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
The May 2022 issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) focuses on skin cancer and features other topics such as fungal infections, updates on new topical advances, and Mohs micrographic surgery. We share this month’s issue highlights straight from the JDD Editor’s desk: Insights in Skin of Color Patients With Atopic Dermatitis and the Role of Skincare in Improving Outcomes concludes …
Tips and Tricks for Diagnosing & Managing Atopic Dermatitis (AD)
atopic dermatitis
by Edita Newton, MD on
Atopic dermatitis is a heterogeneous, chronic inflammatory disease that affects upwards of 10% of children and 7% of adults in the United States. Despite being an incredibly common skin concern among patients, AD continues to pose diagnostic and treatment challenges to dermatologists. What are some common misconceptions about AD? AD always starts in childhood. FALSE. 25% of adults w …
Atopic Dermatitis – Friday Pop Quiz – 4/1/2022
by James J. Contestable, MD on
A father brings in his child who has a history of atopic dermatitis.  He reports a one-week history of blisters on the extremities and states this looks different than his usual eczema. The child is well appearing and happily cooperative with your exam.  What is the next step in management? A. Scabies prep B. Wound culture C. Tzanck smear D. Potassium hydroxide prep E. Punch b …