squamous cell carcinoma

Skin Tumor – Friday Pop Quiz 4/15/2022
by Next Steps In Derm Team on
A 65-year-old male patient with a history of chronic sun exposure presents with the lesion pictured that has developed over the past year. The histopathological findings are notable for enlarged keratinocytes infiltrating into the dermis. What type of mutation is most commonly seen in the pathogenesis of this tumor? A. Transition B. Transversion C. Termination D. Pyrimidine dimer …
Skin Cancer and Photoprotection in People of Color
photoprotection
by Blair Allais, MD on
During the 2021 Skin of Color Update virtual conference, Dr. Maritza Perez opened her lecture by sharing her goal: to assess what is known about skin cancer and photoprotection in people of color. Dr. Perez is a member of the American Academy of Dermatology, who commissioned a workforce to look into this subject. What is known about the epidemiology of keratinocyte carcinomas in people of color? …
Actinic Keratoses: Evidence-Based Treatment Options
Actinic Keratoses
by Jacqueline McKesey, MD, MS on
Dr. Hanke, a dermatologic surgeon who needs no introduction (but I’ll give one anyway!) provided us with an evidence-based discussion of field treatments available for actinic keratoses at ODAC 2021 conference. Just to name a few of Dr. Hanke’s accomplishments, he is the current Senior Vice President of the Skin Cancer Foundation, Senior editor of JDD, and the former president of the AAD, A …
Patient Buzz: Tattoo-Related Skin Reactions
Tattoo-related skin reactions
by Allison Sit on
Allure recently wrote an article about why tattoos can become itchy and raised. What common and uncommon skin reactions should dermatologists keep in mind when treating tattooed patients? For an expert opinion, I contacted Rhode Island dermatologist Matthew Willett, MD, FAAD. What common skin reactions can occur in people shortly after getting a tattoo? The most common acute skin reaction …
Severe Oral Mucositis: A Rare Adverse Event of Pembrolizumab
Oral Mucositis
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
Treatment of malignancy with anti-programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitors can cause mucocutaneous side effects resulting from T cell activation. Due to their recent development, the full side effect profile remains to be fully elucidated, however dermatologic adverse events are most common. The main oral toxicities of these immune checkpoint inhibitors include: xerostomia, dysg …