methotrexate

Intralesional Methotrexate & 5-Fluorouracil for Keratoacanthomas | Cheat Sheet
keratoacanthomas
by Vishal A. Patel, MD | Michael J. Visconti, DO on
Keratoacanthomas are a low-grade, well-differentiated variant of squamous cell carcinoma. Characteristically, their abrupt-onset and crateriform microscopic findings assist with their differentiation from more aggressive squamous cell carcinoma. While surgical treatment remains a viable and appropriate option for their management, clinical scenarios (described below) may portend to better outcomes …
The Many Faces of Psoriasis | Part 2
psoriasis
by Lauren C. Payne, MD, MS, FAAD on
Did you know that psoriasis doesn’t just present on the arms, legs, and trunk? It can also appear in non-conventional locations (aka “special site” psoriasis) including the scalp, face, and body folds (such as the axillary, inframammary, and inguinal fields, and intergluteal clefts). In the skin folds, psoriasis is also referred to as “inverse psoriasis.” In darker skin types, the areas …
Tralokinumab-ldrm Therapeutic Cheat Sheet
tralokinumab
by Emily Murphy, MD on
Atopic dermatitis is a common, chronic, life-altering disease. With its visibility and debilitating pruritus, atopic dermatitis significantly impacts our patients’ quality of life. For those with resistant and extensive disease, we are happy to have numerous new systemic agents at our disposal, one being tralokinumab, an IL-13 antagonist. We continue our series, Therapeutic Cheat Sheet, with a c …
Pediatric Scaling Diseases: An Approach to Pediatric Psoriasis
Pediatric Psoriasis
by Jacqueline McKesey, MD, MS on
Dr. Lawrence F. Eichenfield, meeting co-chair for the 17th Annual Women’s and Pediatric Dermatology Seminar, kicked off session III with a superb talk titled “Scaling the Heights…and Below, Pediatric Scaling Diseases: Psoriasis and Others”,  giving us a bird’s eye view on the old and the new regarding pediatric psoriasis. Dr. Eichenfield is a complete rock star and served as a valued …
Chromate-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis Treated With Dupilumab
Chromate-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis Treated With Dupilumab
by NEXT STEPS IN DERM TEAM on
Chromate causes persistent, difficult to treat irritant and allergic contact dermatitis in cement-handling occupational workers. When therapeutics such as topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, phototherapy and immune-modulating treatments like methotrexate fail, many patients are advised that avoidance may be the only remaining option – an option that may be particularly chall …